Create your own washi tape

20130615-IMG_4534-HYBRID_drutter Scenic Route-Ryder

Happy Hybrid Monday! CT Member Sandy again, with a little project to get your creative wheels spinning. How many of you LOVE wash tape? *go ahead, raise your hand* Well, I know I do! While browsing Pinterest one day, I came across this method of making your own custom wash tape to coordinate with your hybrid projects. (Sorry, I don’t know who to give credit to, I’ve just remembered the concept.) I suppose a more appropriate description would be Japanese Tape, because it is thicker and not transparent. Guess how I accomplished this….? By using standard office supply address labels! Chances are you have some of these in your home or office, so break them out and get ready to play.

Supplies Used:
Scenic Route Papers
Scenic Route Cutting Files Vol. 1
Scenic Route Cutting Files Vol. 2
Sail On Cutting Files
Count On Me Brushes
Count On Me Cutting Files Vol. 1
Avery Address Labels (or other brand)
Other: Stamps, ink, buttons, adhesive, twine, punches.
Silhouette Cameo Digital Cutter or other Electronic Cutter
**(this is optional–if you don’t have one, you can still cut the designs by hand)**

Let’s get started! The first thing I did was open an 8.5 in. X 11 in. letter sized document in Photoshop/PSE. When you look at your address labels, you’ll notice that there are three columns. I measured how much space was needed between each column, so that I created columns in that size in PS with the same dimensions.

Screen Shot 2013-06-15 at 12.34.09 PM

You will notice that I made three columns that I could use as clipping masks for my desired digital papers. I decided to use the Scenic Route Paper Kit because I combined it with the Scenic Route Cutting Files to make a birthday card for my grandson. He is WAY into cars right now! Also, I just love the cute papers and elements in this kit.

I had a little difficulty choosing from between all the fabulous papers, but I eventually narrowed it down. Once I clipped the 3 papers I chose, I flattened the layers. At that point, I bumped up the brightness and vibrancy some to ensure a nicely saturated, finished product.

I will give you a word of advice at this point…print out a test print on fast print to preserve your ink, and check the placement of your columns against the label sheet. Hold it up to a window or something so you can see if your measurements are correct. I will admit, I had to do a little modifying to get the perfect results. I did make a few errors trying to get it right. I ended up giving my “mess-ups” to my grand-daughter to use as pretend band-aids; they were a hit! So, please take my advice and use your typing paper to make your mistakes on. Once you have everything just perfect, go ahead and run the label sheet through your printer. I did NOT choose a label printing option through Microsoft Word. This isn’t the same as making address labels. I printed directly from my PS program. Yes, it did print over the whole sheet, but that is what you want, because it covers each label completely. Check it out!

Is that AWESOME, or what? Just think of all the things you can do with your own, customized tapes…  I bought a bunch of these address labels when my daughter got married, and they have just been sitting around since. I was so glad to be able to use them as part of my crafting arsenal. I thought I would show you the pack I happened to use. I believe I have another brand also, but address labels are the same, standard size. You can also get labels in smaller sizes as well, if desired.

Like I said, I had a card made for my grandson, so I added the striped tapes along the top of the card to mimic the striped paper on the bottom, and to tie in all the colors contained in the card. I also used a heart punch to add as a loving touch. That’s another cool thing you can do–use a little punch to create shapes to add to your projects, and they already have adhesive on the back. How’s that for an extra bonus? I hope I have inspired you to think of new ways to use your digital kits. Deena has such beautiful designs, the hard part is choosing where to start! Thanks for stopping by today, and I hope you will give this a try. If you do, please link us up so we can see your project.

This blog post was written by Sandy Henderson. Leave her a comment or take a moment to like and/or share on Facebook, Pinterest, and Twitter. She’ll enjoy it as much as you enjoyed her blog post. 🙂

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